Previously known as Veteran Sport Australia

BIO: Corporal Jason Moore

Jason will participate at the Allied Winter Sports Camp in Canada in 2023

Jason Moore Headshot

Sport gives me the strength to push forward and to not give up on days I’ve convinced myself that nobody cares. Sport hasn’t just played a role in my rehabilitation it is the reason my wife still has a husband and my son still has a father today. I currently compete in sport on a regular basis and it is my main tool for rehabilitation when it comes to mental health. 

Corporal Jason Moore

ADF Service:

I joined the Australian Defence Force in 2008 as a Rifleman in the Royal Australian Infantry Corps (RAINF). In this time I completed my Basic Para course and Mortars course, amongst other great things. In 2012 I deployed to Afghanistan. Than in 2014 I Corps transferred to the Royal Australian Army Ordinance Corps (RAAOC) where I continue to serve today. 

Age: 37 

Hometown: Campbelltown Sydney NSW 

Current Town: Holsworthy Sydney NSW 

What is the Nature of your injury or illness?

Mental Health – Anxiety and depression are nothing new to me, and I have been dealing with this for some time. I was also diagnosed with Popliteal Artery Entrapment syndrome in both legs in 2010. 

Sport background:

I have always been an active person, especially since joining the ADF. However after surgery on my legs in 2010 I struggled to keep up with my fitness. This is why I transferred to a new role in 2014 and decided that I needed to focus on what I could do, not what I was limited to.

In 2014 I competed in my first natural Bodybuilding competition. From 2014 to 2018 I Competed in Bodybuilding where I hold state and overall titles and competed at national level. Looking for a new challenge I decided to give CrossFit a go. I walked into my first CrossFit gym in 2018 and haven’t looked back. 

What role has sport played in your rehabilitation?

I have faced a lot of challenges in my life, whether it’s been mentally or physically. Sport has always been my outlet when life gets too much, especially CrossFit.  

With my mental health challenges, I have good days and bad, just like everyone else. But on those days where it seems too much to carry on, to face the world or even get out of bed in the morning, sport has always been there. It’s given me purpose and drive when I haven’t had any. It’s given me a sense of belonging when I’ve felt empty and alone inside.  

Sport gives me the strength to push forward and to not give up on days I’ve convinced myself that nobody cares. Sport hasn’t just played a role in my rehabilitation it is the reason my wife still has a husband and my son still has a father today. I currently compete in sport on a regular basis and it is my main tool for rehabilitation when it comes to mental health. 

Why did you apply for the Adaptive Sport Program?

I applied for the Adaptive Sport Program for three reasons. The first was to meet some great and likeminded people. People I could sharing my experience and story with, without feeling judged or embarrassed. The second was to get out of my comfort zone and have a great life experience. And the third reason was to learn something new and have the chance to share that experience with others that are going through the same things I am. I hope my experiences with the Adaptive Sport Program may inspire those struggling with mental health to seek help. 

What will “success” look like for you at the Allied Winter Sports Camp?

Success is measured in so many different ways. For me if I have the opportunity to meet some great people, experience new and exciting things in an amazing place I would normally never have the opportunity to do them, then that is the pinnacle of what success looks like. 

What is your ultimate goal?

In life my ultimate goal is to raise my son to be a great man. The kind of man I strive to become every day of my life. 

My career goal is to medically upgrade and transfer roles to ADF Physical Training Instructor (PTI). I would love to be a Physical Trainer within the ADF and give back to its community and help others to grow within this great organisation. 

What does Unconquered mean to you?  

To me unconquered means to never quit. To never give up when life gets too much. And to never let up when that voice in your heads is screaming at you to let go. 

What is your greatest achievement to date?

I have had the privilege to wear this Army uniform and serve my country for the past 14 years. I have competed at a national level in bodybuilding and have competed in front of amazing crowds in the sport of CrossFit. But nothing even comes close to having my son Maverick. Despite what I may achieve in the rest of my life, my son will always be my greatest and proudest achievement. 

get to know jason in 60 secs


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